Finance & Lending

31
Jan

Discover tips on how to adapt to the new delivery schedule by the U.S. Postal Service:

Published January 12, 2012 by David M. Katz, CFO.com

The U.S. Postal Service’s decision to end next-day delivery could tie up millions of dollars in working capital.

Delivery by letter carriers seems so old-fashioned that it’s been called “snail mail” for years. Yet, as it turns out, most of Corporate America’s invoices still get delivered that way. And the U.S. Postal Service’s December 5 decision to move first-class mail to a two-to-three-day standard seems sure to slow down bill collection for companies large and small.

Indeed, the move could cost a U.S. company with $10 billion in revenues up to $100 million in working capital as a result of its impact on accounts receivable, according to Veronica Heald, a practice leader at REL Consulting, a division of The Hackett Group that focuses on working capital. (CFO is developing a working capital benchmarking product in partnership with REL.)

The impact of the mail delay will be felt in at least two ways, says the consultant, who estimates that 60% of payments received in the United States are via checks in the mail. There will be lags in both the distribution of invoices and the receipt of payments, she adds. Click here to read full story.

 

Category : Cash Flow | Finance & Lending | Blog
31
Jan

Published by Miami Herald, January 16, 2012 by  James Cassel

Small businesses have a responsibility to evaluate their lending relationships and to look for signs of lender fatigue.

Earlier this month, it was reported that Bank of America capped credit lines and restructured repayment plans for an undisclosed number of its small business customers. The move came as a complete surprise to some of these business owners. After all, the capital market is supposedly rebounding, and economic forecasts for 2012 have been encouraging. So, could these small business owners have predicted a falling out with their bank?

Perhaps. Small businesses, more vulnerable and considered more risky by lenders, have a responsibility to evaluate their lending relationships and to look for signs of lender fatigue – signals that their ability to borrow capital may be threatened. I have identified some of the reasons why your bank might consider changing its relationship with you. Some may be the result of what you do, and some may be out of your control. Stay aware of these signs, so you’re not caught by surprise.

 

Category : Finance & Lending | Blog

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